A September Saturday

 

 

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I started sewing around 11:00 a.m. and didn’t finish till the third quarter of the LSU/Auburn game. In my best impression of Coach O, “Gragragrowl, Go Tigahs!”

Two sets of dining room curtains, a tablecloth, a small curtain for the front door, a pair of curtains for the powder room, and a pillow sham for the bed in the front room. Whew! I had fun, though.

Blessings

Add On My Blog Site

I apologize if any of you have seen an add for Planned Parenthood on my blog site theexileskitchen.  I do not support that organization. Children are precious and, where they may come at inopportune times in our overly selfish lives, I would never condone getting ‘rid’  of a baby.

I had a miscarriage 22 years ago. The hospital bill came to me with the treatment listed as a dnc due to a spontaneous abortion. Yes, that is what happened, but the word abortion is so negatively charged, and rightly so, that it wounded me a second time.

I wanted every baby I was pregnant with. God gave me 3 sons here on earth. One child waits for me in heaven. And some day in God’s timimg, I will meet that beautiful child.

I am hurt and appalled that the Planned Parenthood add was foisted onto my blog site. Again, I did not request it, nor do I ask you to contribute to them. I dont know who to talk to to have it removed. And I pray that you, the readers of theexileskitchen,  do not believe for one second that I approve of that organization.

There are Crisis Pregnancy Centers all over the country. If you find yourself with an unplanned pregnancy, contact them, not Planned Parenthood.  In the Pike County area in Mississippi their phone number is 601-684-3987 and they are located at 406 Delaware Ave, McComb, MS 39648.

Matthew 19:14

Psalm 139:14

God, bless the children and forgive the wicked practice of killing the unborn.

August Cookie of the Month: Cranberry Pecan Shortbread

This recipe incorporates two of my favorites: dried cranberries and pecans. Shortbread has a minimal amount of ingredients. Easy. Great with hot or cold tea, afternoon coffee.

Ingredients:

1 1/4 cup of Land-O-Lakes butter, softened

1 cup powdered sugar

2 1/4 all-purpose flour

4 oz chopped dried cranberries

1/2 cup chopped pecans

A couple tablespoons of granulated sugar and powdered sugar in separate bowls

What to do:

Cream butter and powdered sugar till fluffy. A 1/4 cup at a time, add the flour; Mixer on low, so not to flour up your kitchen. Then add in the dried cranberries and pecans. This dough is stiff.

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Divide the shortbread into thirds, form  two logs, wrapped in parchment paper and label it. Placed in the freezer, it will be ready for gatherings this fall.

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Roll the last part of the shortbread into 1 inch balls and place an inch apart on a parchment lined cookie sheet. With a little glass dipped in granulated sugar, flatten the shortbread.

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Bake in a preheated 325° degree oven for about 15 minutes, depending on your oven. Don’t over brown these cookies. Shortbread is light in color.

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Cool the shortbread slightly on the cookie sheet, then roll in the extra powdered sugar. Next, cool completely on a wired wrack.

These shortbread cookies are light and buttery. I can’t wait for afternoon coffee.

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Shortbread Blessings from the Exile’s Kitchen.

My Cup of Coffee Went to Heaven and Came Back For Me to Enjoy

When I was in England a few years back, the ladies of the New Milton church we were helping that week served us cream and fresh berries one evening. One bite and I asked, “Okay, what’s in this?”

“Oh, that’s the clotted cream you’re tasting,” was their off handed answer.

Weird name, but Oh my gosh! Hard to describe, but Oh my gosh! Here’s the nutritional values for this gift from heaven.

https://www.eatthismuch.com/food/view/english-clotted-cream,569770/

A happy memory of that week in New Milton popped into mind a few months back and I have been researching recipes and trying them out.  I remember asking Julia, a lovely little lady from an afternoon spent at her dining table and back garden– y’all, Bill and Julia had a gorgeous garden, packed with flowers and vegetables.  I made the mistake of calling it a yard and they when they bristled at my very American gaff, I quickly corrected and said, “I mean garden!”— anyway, I asked Julia for a recipe on clotted cream and she just waved her little hand in a dismissive manner. “Just pour it in a dish and put it in the oven,” she answered.

And it is that simple. And it’s so dang good you’ll think that it can’t be that easy. Heavy whipping cream plus nothing. Kinda like salvation: Jesus plus nothing…

Here’s what I’ve learn to do:

Pour 2 cups heavy whipping cream into a shallow baking dish. Place in a 175° oven. Close the door and leave it alone for 12 hours. Don’t stir it, don’t jiggle it. Leave it alone. I usually put it in the oven a couple of hours before bed and when I get up the next morning it’s ready to come out. Cool to room temperature, cover in plastic wrap and place in the refrigerator for another 12 hours. It’s worth the wait. The top layer will be deep golden and uderneath that is a creamy white layer. The cream solids seperate from the whey. Scrape the solids into a jar and put a lid on it. The liquid left in the bottom of the dish can be used in baking.

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This evening I poured it into my cup of coffee, sending it to heaven and back! People are putting all kinds of things in coffee these days, from butter to coconut oil so, why not clotted cream whey? Swirled it around, turning it a lovely cafe ole` color. The fat glistening on top.

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Simple summer supper was a cool one tonight: Vanilla Greek yogurt, fresh blueberries, and a big scoop of clotted cream! If you’ve got a do-nothing weeknight, try out this clotted cream recipe.

Blessings from the Exile’s Kitchen.

Revisiting A Dorm Room Recipe

School starts next week, here in our part of the world. If you have a college student leaving soon, tuck this easy, penny pinching, portable recipe in their belongings. Breakfast is the most important meal of the day, you know?

Can This Really Be Considered Cooking or Dorm Room Fare

Eggs, bacon, toast or an English muffin, salt and pepper make Easy Dorm Fare Omlettes. As most dorms allow microwaves and mini fridges, this recipe is a winner for your college student.

What to do:

Crack an egg into a saucer that’s been spritzed with vegetable spray. Season with salt and pepper and lightly whisk with a fork. Lay one piece of bacon on top of the egg. Place in microwave, cover and nuke for 2 1/2 minutes. Serve either on toast or an English muffin. A little jelly adds a touch of sweetness and is great with the savory flavors of egg and bacon.

Blessings to your college student from the Exile’s Kitchen.

20160103_075559 Vegetable spray will make the microwave omlette slide from saucer to toast so easy.20160103_080508Yum! Easy Dorm Fare Omlettes

 

Bright year blessings from the Exile’s Kitchen .

Peaches and Puttering Around

I went to the McComb Farmer’s Market Thursday, looking for bell peppers. Love stuffed peppers! Local honey and fresh peaches is what I came away with.

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Peach preserves? Peach cobbler? Peach pie filling? I decided I’d make peach butter.  For one pint, only three ingredients: 5 large, pitted peaches, 1 cup sugar, 1/2 cup water. No need to peel your peaches.

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I had enough peaches to make about 6 pints. In an 8 quart pot, I simmered the peaches and water till tender.

 

 

 

Here’s a tip; vent the lid on your 8 quart pot or you will be cleaning up a big mess. Big stcky mess.

After the peaches were tender, I let it cool slightly and then pureed with an immersion blender. Bringing the  puree back to a simmer, I stirred in the sugar. Cooking at a gentle boil till the mixture thickened, I stirred it often to keep it from burning or sticking. When it was thick enough to coat the back of a spoon without running off, I poured the peach butter into sterilized canning jars, sealed and process them in a water bath canner for 10 minutes.

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As you can see, I used different sized jars. It’s the end of canning season for me, so I filled what I had. It’s been a fun spring and summer, stocking the pantry.

Its taken two years of renovations to make my farmhouse livable and comfortable. Now, on Saturdays I can putter around.

I’ve told y’all before that I didn’t start drinking coffee till I was fifty. Late bloomer, I know. Coffee, however, has turned into a morning must. A well stocked drawer of coffee accoutrements-and, you know- “Coffee Time”. Plus, with coffee supplies arranged in a drawer, it frees up counter space.

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This drawer had held kitchen papers and freezer bags, but I cleared it out to just have coffee stuff. The adjacent drawer was the junk drawer- every appliance manual, miscellaneous hardware, twist ties- those got moved to the bottom drawer and kitchen papers were placed in that space. Neat and tidy, just don’t ever open the bottom drawer…

Let’s see… putter-putter. I’ve got homemade clotted cream setting up in the frig. Manna from heaven. Smear it on a biscuit and then top with peach butter. Oh, yes!

I picked lots of hot peppers and a few figs. Thinking about braving the heat and starting on sanding and painting a cabinet that will return to its original wall mount. I said I was thinking about starting.

Life is peachy, nowadays. (Oo, groan)

Blessings from the Exile’s Kitchen.

No Churn Berry Cake Ice Cream

 

No Churn Vanilla Ice Cream became Berry Cake Ice Cream.

In a mixer pour in a 16 ounce carton of heavy whipping cream. While that’s spinning around, in another bowl combine 1 can of fat free sweetened condensed milk,  a pinch of salt and a teaspoon of vanilla. When the cream is whipped, fold one cup into the sweetened condensed milk mixture. Then add that back into the whipped cream, stirring lightly, till well combined. Pour into a bread pan and cover with plastic wrap. Place in the freezer till firm. Serve over warm apple pie or a brownie or your choice, your choice.

My choice off add-ins this time was leftover berry cake from the 4th of July. A strawberry cake mix, baked up with a ribbon of blueberry pie filling in the middle. The cake was sliced and put in the freezer to be eaten later, but I thought adding it to this ice cream recipe would be a cool way to use remaining cake.

 

 

 

Enjoying the Summer season.

Blessings from the Exile’s Kitchen.

The Grand Ole Flag

Happy Independence Day from #FlowersProper and theexileskitchen.com What are you cooking on the grill this July 4th? I think I’ll let the budding grill master Georgie plan the menu and do all the work.

I bought a new American flag and pole yesterday.  My father placed a deep vein of Patiotism in me and my brothers. He traveled all over the world on business trips and those travels made him love our country all the more.

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Is your flag flying? Well, go put it out. Proudly.

Patriotic Blessings from the Exile’s Kitchen.

Serendipity

It’s been busy in the Exile’s Kitchen.  Canning green beans, making pickle relish. Arranging buckets of fresh cut flowers. Two gallons of blueberries became two batches of pie filling. And there was some juice left over. From the blueberries. Hummmm. Wonder if I could make Blueberry Jelly, not jam, because I used all the berries to make pie filling?

Something didn’t work out just right, even with two boxes of pectin. I poured it into the jelly jars anyway and sealed them, and processed them. Jelly turned out to be syrup. Made me think of vacations taken as a child where IHOP and Waffle House were always a welcome sight to us weary travelers. What syrup to pick to drizzle over waffles..? Well, since my jelly didn’t set up, I can have homemade IHOP/Waffle House any day of the week without leaving the driveway.

That’s the definition of serendipity, my friends. Getting something equally good or better out of an unexpected turn of events. Wanted jelly, got syrup. I haven’t thought about my once marriage in a long time. Yesterday’s kitchen happenings brought these thoughts to mind. What I thought I wanted at the age of 20 turned out not to be what I got. What I have now I would not trade for anything. Serenity. Peace.

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Blueberry Blessings from the Exile’s Kitchen.

June Cookie of the Month

File this one under super easy coffee dunker. And cheap? My yes! Made with flour tortillas, you can make many, many for pennies.

Cut four,  8 inch flour tortillas into six triangles each and place them in a single layer, on a parchment lined cookie sheet. Lightly spritz tortillas with vegetable spray. Dust with cinnamon sugar snd bake till crisp in 350° oven. While they baked, I cut up a handful of Hershey Kisses into small chunks.. I had them on hand, but you could use regular chocolate morsels and skip the chopping. After the cinnamon tortillas have baked, sprinkle the chocolate on top of the hot triangles. The chocolate will melt slightly. I took a butter knife and smeared the kisses chunks around a little.

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This vase is my favorite, bought at a Virginia Beach farmer’s market years ago. The flowers I grew myself. Autumn Beauty sunflowers, mixed zinnias, and brilliant white cosmos. The cosmos is the front runner this year and the Viceroy of butterflies adore it, too,

 

So good with a cup of afternoon coffee.

 

 

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This week, I’ve also made two kinds of pickles: Bread and Butter and Spicy Dill. The slide show is of the first batch Bread and Butter. They remind me of my daddy’s sister, Aunt Louise. She was a fantastic cook and had a pantry full of homemade goodness, including Bread and Butter pickles. On a visit to her home in Homer, Louisiana way back in the late 80’s, Aunt Louise gifted me with a jar. They were so good! I guess I make pickles because, yes they’re tasty, but they connect me to fond memories of Aunt Louise.

Garden Blessings from the Exile’s Kitchen.

Cook Out Season Has Begun

George decided he would try his hand at cooking out.

 

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Steak and vegetable kabobs and fruit kabobs. His first time manning the little Weber Kettle, he did quite well. We look forward to George expanding his grilling skills.

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George picked up a few fun artisan sodas by Swamp Pop.

If you’re wanting to try an artisan soda with a local flair, look for Swamp Pop in your neighborhood grocer. They are made in Lafayette, Louisiana. Their flavors incorporate fruits grown in my native state, such as fig, strawberry, satsuma. Swamp Pop sodas are a refreshing change to your regular cola. Try ’em!

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Memorial Day Blessings from the Exile’s Kitchen.

#whattodowithallofthissquash

Early to the garden.

The sun climbed high. Sweat walked down the small of my back, as I worked. Red wing blackbirds trilled; a woodpecker beat a tattoo. The breeze whispered in the corn. Another mess of yellow squash was gathered. It was delightful.

Except for two things. And I know that talking about the weather is the worst thing in writing, but my goodness it’s dry in southwest Mississippi. If you who are reading this are a praying bunch, please lift up a prayer for rain in our part of the world. The corn may be whispering today, but it will soon be crying from a lack of water. Rain, we need rain.

The second thing that marred my mornings peace was the four-wheeler, riding teenager. Up and down the fence row he went. Loudness, covering my idyllic pastoral setting.  He tried to coax Marigold to ride with him, but she politely declined and stretched out on the shady porch instead.

The squash was taken to the kitchen, but wasn’t cooked up. I made a flower arrangement out of some, along with the first picked cosmos. The tips of the wisteria are on their second bloom. All were arranged on an antique platter. I call it Geese In the Flower Patch.

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Saturday May 19, 2018. Nearly perfect.

A post shared by Amanda Ellison Anglin (@a.anglin) on

The day ended with a visit from my favorite fella- favorite for right now. His Mama goes to the hospital early on Monday to have his baby brother and then I’ll have two favorite fellas.

Saturday blessings from the Exiles Kitchen.

 

 

I Shook The Tree One More Time or I’m Your Huckleberry

(I promise. This is the last time I write about mayhaws… This year. Simple recipe: 4 cups juice, 1 box Sure-Jell, 2 pat butter, 5 cups sugar)

 

Mayhaw season is coming to a close. Sigh. Yesterday I shook the tree one more time. I pruned it too. Due to years of neglect, branches have crisscrossed each other. Not a good thing. You want lateral branches on your fruit trees with room for air to get to each branch. The old mayhaw is also covered in lichen, which tells me the tree is in distress and needs to be fertilized. Even still,  the old gal produced lots of berries this year. I was able to make three batches of jelly in the last two weeks.

This final gathering was a little slim on mayhaws, but the huckleberries are making. So, I supplemented my pot with the tiny blueberry-like fruit. While picking huckleberries, my eldest son called me.

The conversation went something like this:

“Heeeey! Whatcha you doing?”

“I shook the mayhaw tree one last time, but I don’t think there’s enough to make another pot of jelly, so I’m picking huckleberries to add to them.” I told him.

“Huckleberries? Are you sure that’s what they are?” he questioned.

“Yes, son. I tasted a few last week, when I noticed them making and I haven’t gotten sick. No belly cramps. Not throwing up or running to the bathroom.”

“Oh, okay. Good deal.”

My sons; They have their mama’s back… always looking out for me.

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Mayhaw and huckleberry added together in the final pot of jelly. The color was deep red.

After jelly making, I cleaned house. The afternoon sun slid in through the parlor windows and warmed up the pine floors. It was such a peaceful afternoon. The birds sang all around me, as I repotted day lilies and roses on the side porch.

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We almost had a new grandbaby last night. My middle son’s wife was having some pretty intense contractions around 11 p.m. Off to the hospital they went, as I stayed with my sleeping #1 grandson. But the hospital sent her home. So, we’re just sitting on go. Anytime now. I think I’ll nickname my new grandson ‘Huckleberry’. 

“Who’s Mandy’s little Huckleberry?” I’ll ask.

“I’m your Huckleberry,” he’ll answer in a sweet toddler voice.

I wonder what his parents will have to say about that?

As I told my eldest, before the rain chased me back to the house and ended our phone call yesterday; I’m having fun. Life is fun again, full again. And there’s always room for more family and friends- at my table, in my house, and in my life!

Blessings from the Exile’s Kitchen.

 

 

 

Mayhaw Time

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Today was the first time I’ve made jelly in the Exile’s New Kitchen.  Mayhaw Jelly: such a sweet, rosey red. I taste tested with a wheat cracker.  Yum!

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Confession time…

I’ve got a thing for canning jars. I didn’t need any new jelly jars, but I saw these small, squatty, wide mouth made by Kerr and thought, ‘Oh, why not?’ Plus, a straight-sided, wide mouth jar will make it easier to scrape out every bit of Mayhaw jelly.

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Mayhaw Jelly, April 2018, from the Jam Pot at Flowers Proper.

My recipe for Mayhaw Jelly can be found from last year’s post And Then The Murders Began.

Blessings from the Exile’s Kitchen.

Punch Bowl

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Family punch bowl

In the 1960’s, my mother and her sisters were on a mission. The ESSO gas stations in Baton Rouge were giving away a punch cup with a fill up. After 24 full tanks of gas, the punch bowl and stand were free. Working together, Mama and my aunts pooled their punch cups and boom! The family now had a community punch bowl, which has been used for countless wedding and baby showers.

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The family punch bowl took center stage again this Sunday, for a baby shower honoring my two daughters-in-law. A new granddaughter and a new grandson are arriving in a few weeks.

Baby blessings from the Exile’s Kitchen.

April Cookie of the Month: Cake Mix Cookies

I said back in December, when I unpacked my cookie jar collection, that I would do a cookie of the month. Well, here goes the first recipe four months late:

Cake Mix Cookies

1 yellow cake mix ($1 aisle

1/2 cup brown sugar

1/4 cup peanut butter

1/2 cup Greek yogurt (all I had on hand was flavored)

1/4 cup corn oil

8 Hershey’s Miniatures broken up into small pieces

What to do:

Preheat your oven to 350°. Spray muffin top pans with vegetable spray and set aside.

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In a large bowl mix all of the ingredients. Form dough into balls (about 1 inch or so) and place one in each muffin space.

 

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With a fork, make a crisscross pattern

Place in your preheated oven and bake for 10 to 12 minutes.

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Cool cookies in the pan for a couple of minutes, so they set up. These cookies are crispy on the outside and chewy on the inside. Cool completely on wire wracks and then place in your favorite cookie jar. This recipe makes 2 1/2 dozen.

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I filled the jar that my oldest granddaughter Parker will get when she grows up and gets her first kitchen. The big strawberry came from Jeanie’s Antiques that was once in Osyka, Mississippi.

Parker is having a baby sister in June. I have been sewing every spare minute I can scrape together. Wednesday evening my 32 year old Dial and Sew sewing machine bit the dust. A trip to the store with the W on it, netted me a new Singer. Wow! is all I can say. Such a difference. I love the new machine and won’t miss the old one.

 

The see through bobbin cover is great; no more sewing nothing, when you’ve run out of bobbin thread,  but didn’t know it. It also has many decorative and monograming stitches to play with. The price was around $200. I am very pleased with it.

Grandmotherly blessings from the Exile’s Kitchen.

 

Waffles and Sausage Kind of Night

I decided this morning that we would have breakfast for supper. Waffles and sausage patties. Still have a big bowl of fresh Louisiana strawberries. Cool Whip.

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To keep the waffles crisp, place in a 200° oven while you’re waffling…

What about you? Do you ever have breakfast for supper? And if so, what do you fix?

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Just like Waffle House, but I didn’t have to get back in the car after a long day at work.

Breakfast Supper blessings from the Exile’s Kitchen .

Good Friday and Holy Saturday

On Good Friday, my mother and I drove to Baton Rouge to continue a tradition begun decades ago. Backseat loaded with Easter lilies, we visited family grave sites in three different cemeteries.

First, my father’s grave in Resthaven.

George L. Ellison was the last of the good guys. Period.

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Roselawn is a very old cemetery near downtown Baton Rouge. The church bells in the neighborhood chimed on the hour and then rang out hymns, while we worked our way through the different plots. The baby’s grave first. Great Aunts and Uncles. Great Grandmother. Cousins. Finally my Grandmother’s.

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How I loved her! Such a strong lady.

We meandered our way back to Mississippi, but first went to Ponchatoula for fresh Louisiana strawberries. Yum!

I deposited Mama at her house, picked up Marigold and headed to the country. The shelves are finally finished in the media room/ parlor, so I dug out my library. It warmed up the space. The front facing books are by my favorite illustrator (award winning, btw).  He happens to be my brother Chris Ellison. King of the Stable by Melody Carlson features my middle son at age 6 years old. In M is for Mom by Mary Ann McCabe Riehle there is a painting of my mother and nephew picking flowers in her Magnolia, MS garden. This book would be a great gift for Mother’s Day. You can find all of the books illustrated by Chris Ellison on Amazon.

 

 

Holy Saturday brought lots of sunshine and my middle son. All of those seeds I’ve been wanting to plant were, finally.

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Twenty-one rows, 125 feet long. Makes me chuckle. Now. In June I might not be smiling. Yeah, I will. I have longed to play in the dirt and grow my own food. Someone said that at the end of the day you should smell like sunshine and dirt. It was wonderful.

This year this Exile will be cooking home grown goodness.

Blessings

I See Supper

At the Walthall County Co-op the other afternoon, I picked out more seed for my garden. Someone looked at the packages and said they saw a lot of hard work.

“Well, I see supper,” I replied.

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The seedlings of squash and peppers, started a few weeks ago, needed repotting. With them, I see squash casserole, zucchini bread, stuffed bell pepper, and jars of pepper jelly.

 

And finally, the big shelves in the palor/media room are finished and ready for books. I see big family gatherings happening in this room; game nights, football watching, reading bedtime stories.

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Blessings from the Exile’s Kitchen.

Sounds Like A British Put Down

Happy Saturday.  Dont forget to set your clocks forward an hour; Daylight Savings Time starts tomorrow. We will see how many get to church on time Sunday.

This mornings breakfast is scrambled eggs and jelly tarts. Jelly Tarts sounds like a British put down. “She’s no lady. She’s nothing more than a jelly tart!”

Here’s how to make the lady in question:

Ingredients:

1 box of roll out pie crust- 2 in a box

1/2 cup of your favorite jelly (I used homemade mayhaw)

1 tablespoon all purpose flour

1/2 cup powdered sugar

1 Land-O-Lakes Mini Moo’s half and half creamer cup

What to do:

Preheat oven to 400°. Roll out 1 pie crust and using a pizza cutter, square off the round of dough, just a little. These will be rustic tarts, not so perfect you’re afraid to eat them. With the pizza cutter, cut dough into 8 equal as you can make them rectangles.

In a small dish, mix jelly and flour. Spoon and spread a dollop of jelly mixture onto 4 of the rectangles. Top with the remaining dough rectangles and crimp the edges with a fork. Place on a parchment lined parking sheet. Repeat with remaining pie crust and jelly mixture. Bake till lightly brown, about 10 to 12 minutes.

While the tarts are baking, in another small dish mix together powdered sugar and a Mini Moo to make the icing. When the tarts are cool, spread their tops with the icing. If you want to gild that lily, uh, I mean tart, sprinkle the tops with your choice of sanding sugar.

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Enjoy and don’t forget to set your clocks forward.

Blessings from the Exiles Kitchen.

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Harbingers of Spring

I did no work at my house today. We were celebrating; it was my grandson’s birthday. He is now a big 2 years old.

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The daffodils in the backyard are up and cheerfully blooming. Camellias of every color are opening, even though some cold nights have bitten them back. A bouquet for my daughter-in-law was picked.

I have a countertop full of seeds. Vegetable packets from Johnny’s and flower seeds from Wildseed Farms are yearly harbingers of Spring. Now, if only the pecan trees would bud out, I could plant them.

Blessings from the Exiles Kitchen.

Chocolate Coffee Cake

The Mardi Gras creep has hit our part of Mississippi. It used to be that if you wanted to celebrate, New Orleans, Louisiana or Mobile, Alabama was your party destination. Now the once Catholic-only observance has crept into small towns all over our area. I said all that, because getting to my farmhouse this morning meant taking the long way ’round. Magnolia has become part of the Mardi Gras creep, offering not just a family friendly parade,  but also a carnival. Shutting down the streets for the parade made navigating through town and out to the country difficult. A thirty minute drive wound up taking twice as long.

Clean up around the barn has started. We’re turning an old garden spot into an area to raise bottle calves – for the freezer – not for pets. Won’t be giving them names… Unless we christen it Barbie for barbecue!

While I waited for my helpers to arrive, I put together the following recipe: Chocolate Coffee Cake. Super simple.

Chocolate Coffee Cake

Ingredients:

1 small boxed chocolate cake mix (I found the mix I used today on the  $1 aisle of the Piggly Wiggly. Pick up a couple. They’re great for a quick mix-up.)

1/2 cup of water

2 large eggs

2 tablespoons vegetable oil

2 tablespoons white sugar

1/2 teaspoon cinnamon

What to do:

Preheat your oven to 350°. Spray a 9″ cake pan with vegetable spray. In a medium bowl, mix the first 4 ingredients together and pour into prepared cake pan. In a small bowl, combine the sugar and cinnamon. Shake the cinnamon sugar evenly over the top of the cake batter. Place cake pan in the center of the oven, baking about 30 minutes or until the cake pulls away from the sides of the pan or a knife, inserted into the center, pulls out clean. Cool in the pan and then transfer to a pretty plate.

 

 

After stringing fence, we went inside and enjoyed coffee and cake on a drizzly, February Saturday afternoon.

Blessings from the Exile’s Kitchen .

Furnishings

The single Jenny Lind bed had been my Aunt Irma’s when she was a little girl. Loaned to my mother for my use, it was the bed that I slept in from the time I climbed out of the baby bed, till I got married and left my mother’s home. When my mother moved to Mississippi nineteen years ago, my aunt said that I could have the bed. I was thrilled. Family heirloom. All three of my sons have used the bed as their own, during their growing up years.

I mentioned in an earlier post that I- we- had emptied the storage units I had been renting for so long. I couldnt wait to set up the Jenny Lind bed in my room.

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This is the way my room looked in June 2016.

I have been gathering furnishings for a few months. The area rug came from Wayfair. The gray bedspread was bought at the store with the big “W” on it. Amazon was where I found the pretty curtains. The pinwheel patterned quilt is one I made myself many years ago. The colors match nicely and I was pleasantly surprised. I guess we all gravitate to certain colors our whole lives. Soft blue and white have shown up over and over in my life.

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The pine floors were refinished a year ago. See the contrast from these new pictures to the top one? They had actually been painted to look like mahogany. And whatever your opinion may be about maintaining a true Craftsman vibe to a farmhouse as old as mine and keeping the floors dark, I love the lighter, more natural pine color. 20180121_143809

Miss Marigold and I walked the property this afternoon. A visit to the barn first. I love the ancient barn; wouldn’t trade it for anything! You step back in time when you step into its shadows. We also surveyed the perimeter of my big field, picking up trash thrown out by passersby. I was happy to see that the daffodils I planted a year ago have begun to stretch from the sleepy ground. Can Spring be close? We can hope.20180121_144727

Worship this morning. Homemaking at noon. Being a landowner this afternoon.

Blessings from the Exiles Kitchen.

MaBell Simple Supper

Simple suppers are a must during playoff season- well, any season that you’re busy. We’re watching the Saints get spanked by the Vikings right now. Sigh.

Oh well, supper will be good.

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I cooked extra MaBell Smoked Sausage for this mornings breakfast and now it’s anchoring our supper dish: Red Jambalya. Here’s what to do~

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In a skillet, heat up 1tbl of cooking oil. Add 2 ribs of chopped celery and one small, chopped onion. Soften up, but don’t over cook it. Throw in 1 pound precooked MaBell Smoked Sausage. Add cup white rice. Then add a medium sized can of diced tomatoes. Fill the can with water and pour over the rice and meat mixture. Season to taste with salt, pepper, garlic powder and Cajun seasoning. I like mine a little spicy. Cover and cook over medium heat till the rice is cooked through.

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MaBell’s Smoked Sausage is packaged by King’s, a local meat processing company in Southwest Mississippi and their smoked sausage has made them famous. They ship all over the country. If you would like a sampler of their products, here’s their address:

King’s Packing Company

3066 Hwy 570

Summit, MS 39666

Happy simple supper from the Exile’s Kitchen.

Empty

Happy New Year

That’s it. No punctuation. 2017 was a roller coaster. We had some very good days, like Sunday, December 31. My granddaughter was baptised. That was a wonderful way to end the year.

But there were many days last year spent in the hospital with my mother. And I said final, earthly good-byes to cousins and friends. Good and bad equalled out, I guess. Felt like a roller coaster, though.

I did, finally, get to empty the storage units that I had been renting since September 2014. That was a burden lifted from my shoulders- my sons did the heavy lifting. Ha! It will also free up funds to go to something else.

At my farmhouse the empty boxes piled up on the porch, as the collections found a permanent home. Tea pots, Fire King mixing bowls, Flora Gold depression glass. Sadly, many pieces of the depression glass did not make it out of the storage unit whole. Delicate cups and saucers, an oblong butter dish, footed scalloped dishes and a big platter were shattered. Oh, well. I had fun all those years ago searching to build the collection and now I get to do it again.

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Three years ago when we were packing up my belongings, many cookie jars in particular, my eldest son told me: “Mama, when you eventually get settled somewhere, I know one thing; when I come to visit, there better be cookies in everyone of these cookie jars!”

I found them as I unpacked. I can tell you where they came from and/or who gave them to me. There’s a very inviting and satisfying sound to a lifted cookie jar top. Washed and dried, then lined up on the kitchen counter.

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Strawberry:Jeanie Antiques, Osyka, MS – Miss Pig:New Orleans – Apple:Walmart – Blue Gingerbread Boy: Ponchatoula, LA – Pressed Glass: Church Christmas Exchange -Red Painted Fruit: New Orleans – Yellow Glass w Cookie cut-outs: New Orleans. Mama  gave me most of them; she and Aunt Lina loved to go junking. I have some new-to-me new ones to add.

 

Thinking about what my son said, and seeing how cheery they all looked grouped together, cookie recipes starting coming to mind. Expect a cookie of the month recipe for 2018.  There that’s my New Year’s resolution. Let’s see if I can keep it.

I also found all of my cookbooks. Many Southern Living cookbooks, including the two that have my recipe for Granola Muffins. I had originally called the recipe Cereal Muffins, but the kitchens at Southern Living renamed it.

 

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I always liked the intro they wrote to my recipe.

I know I’m not suppose to write about the weather, but I just can’t help myself. It’s cold, folks! The high temperature for our part of Mississippi is 34°. You Yankees are probably telling me not to complain. Remember, I’m Southern. My blood is thin. As soon as Christmas is over, I long for warmer weather and planting flowers and vegetables. I’m excited about the prospect of homegrown food and flowers on my table again.

New Year’s Blessings from the Exiles Kitchen.

Miscellaneous Fun Stuff

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Unpacking the mountain of boxes, the handwritten label made me smile.
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The lifted lid revealed childhood toys.
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Three little boys received Santa scooters. They held bright balls of bubble gum, once upon a time. The cloth dolls I made myself: Gardening Angels complete with sun hats.

 

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Cookies for Santa plate, made in 1994. Two more were made for grandparents that same year.
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A gunslinger cowboy galloped out of a box.
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One of many boxes marked “Christmas”, found last, reminded me of the reason for the season. This three piece Nativity was bought during another Yule, when I was feeling down. Finding it today lifted my spirits.

Blessings from the Exiles Kitchen.

Christmas Time/ Bad Dog

I haven’t written much lately; just haven’t been inspired by much of anything. The flu has kicked our behinds the last three weeks, with my mother in the hospital for one of them. It snowed while she was in the hospital. It was like a giant baker had taken his sifter and sprinkled the whole area with confectioners sugar. Driving home from the hospital that Friday afternoon, I thought I had taken a wrong turn and wound up in Narnia. White was everywhere. Beautiful and cold. I didn’t take a single picture.

My mother’s health has not improved much since we’ve been home. Saturday I listened to Christmas carols, while I baked sugar cookies and fought the dog, trying to keep her away from the bowls of icing.  She managed to lap all in the green. No, I didn’t use it. I made more. Bad dog.

I had thought about sharing a recipe for sugar cookies and decorating sugar cookies, but it’s late in the Season and really, do I need to add my trivial offering to the plethora of cookie traditions?

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This was as far as I got on documenting my baking yesterday. I finished them, filling them in with tinted icing to look like reindeer. They taste good- small bob of the head to acknowledge my accomplishment.

I mentioned the bad dog. Early yesterday morning I had her on her lead in the back yard. She slipped said lead and disappeared for a couple hours. The animal control officer was about to pack her in when I found her. Back at home, she acted a little off. She disappeared into the hallway and upchucked… Twice! Yeah…. Called the vets office. She’s fine and back to her normal self. Bad dog.

Not much in the mood for Christmas this year. Well, the commercial side of it, anyway.

I lost a sweet friend a month ago. Scrolling through my contacts today,  I saw her number and the heart emojis she had typed in answer to a text I had sent back in August.

Also yesterday, in between batches of cookies, I washed a quilt that had been given as a prize at a family reunion a few years back. Each family member present had signed it.  As I pulled it out of the washer to put in the dryer, the first name I saw was of my cousin Homer. He passed away in January of this year.

I guess I’m just sad this year and missing many people from my past. My Daddy. My grandmothers.  My cousins. My friend. I’m glad, thankful, that one day I’ll see them all again.

We get caught up in the hustle of a secular Christmas. Hey, folks, it’s not your birthday! It’s the Savior’s birthday.  Remember what is important.

Christmas Blessings from the Exile’s Kitchen.

 

Two Weekends

Nottaway Plantation held its second annual wine walk a couple of weeks ago. I fell in love with this white castle when I was a young girl in 1980. It had been restored and opened to the public for tours. My parents and I took a road trip and we were some of the first visitors through their renovated doors.

 

So, when I saw on social media that Nottaway was having a wine walk, I wanted to go. Problem was I know nothing about wine and didn’t want to go alone. Enter my birthday sister Trina. When I asked if she would go, she was all in. And even though the home was serving heavy hor dourves, we made it fun, by bringing our own: Plain and Barbecue Vienna Sausage. You know, real foodie minds have tried to answer the question for years: Which wine to serve with Vienna Sausage?

Eight stations for wine tastes were set up in the beautiful home. We test tasted sips of different wines and only the sommelier at table five gave us legit suggestions as to which wines would go better with Vienna Sausage.  There was a sparkling Brut Rose from J Vineyards that was just lovely to sip. Another  I liked was an inexpensive Charles Smith called Kung Fu Girl Riesling. So, to answer the question of which to serve with your chicken meat sticks, go with a sparkling white wine or rose.

This past weekend, we had an early Thanksgiving at my farmhouse. This year is the only time that all three of my sons will be in their twenties, so to commemorate that milestone, pictures were taken. Out to the big barn we all went.

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Team Player became a brotherhood catch phrase many years ago. The three were playing football with their Uncle and my oldest scored. My middle son kind of pouted and their Uncle said he needed to be a team player. The youngest eagerly announced that he could be a team player. He was no more than 5 at the time,  hand caught up in his sweaty t-shirt, exposing his belly, he asserted: “I team player! I team player!”

The three brothers have been just that: team players. We nicknamed them Adam,  Hoss and Little Joe Cartwright. They have always had each other’s backs. They are fun to be with. I hope that you have the same blessing with your children.

And speaking of children! I have two more grandbabies on the way!

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Thanksgiving Blessings from the Exiles Kitchen.

I Caved

I know, I know; don’t start a piece about the weather because it’s suppose to kill any chance of one’s writing ever being good (see And Then The Murders Began), but we had our first spate of cold weather this week and it’s still October and before I realized it, I caved and Harry Connick Jr. was singing Silent Night in that New Orleans accent of his, as I drove to my farmhouse Saturday morning. I also listened to my favorite Christmas cantata called An Evening In December. It’s all acapella and long about the middle they do a jazzy version of O Come, O Come, Emmanuel. This second soprano hits all these notes that are all over the place and I can’t help myself: I add my voice to hers.

Yesterday morning, Marigold the bloodhound puppy was stretched out in the back seat, I’m singing away at the top of my voice to this classic Christmas carol. Now, at the end of this version the soloist takes a turn with a note that flies to the stratosphere.  And I went with her… No, it was not pretty… How do I know it wasn’t pretty? Well, I do have ears and so does Marigold. She didn’t howl,  but she brought her pointy nose right up to my shoulder, head cocked to one side, as if to enquire if I was alright. What was I howling for? I gave her a pat on the head and assured her I was fine.

Too early for Christmas music? Maybe. It’s not too early for pralines. One of my daughters-in-law messaged me last week to see if it was praline season. My reply, “Yep!”

In the Exile’s New Kitchen, I made two batches of honey pralines. I’ve shared my recipe with you before (see Pecans and Pralines). It was so much fun trying out my new stove. And the granite countertops cool surface was perfect for dropping pralines.

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In addition to making pralines, I worked on drywall in what will be one of the new bathrooms. My sons have hung the sheetrock for me, and as I am on a tight budget, well, to say we’ve cut corners is an understatement. A picture is worth a 1000 words, so exhibit A.

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Exhibit A

I told my boys that they have way too much confidence in their mother’s ability to float sheetrock. My middle son told me, while laughing yesterday, “It looks beautiful, Mom. And we figured just enough pieces to finish the bathroom. Waste not, want not.”

I laughed too and told him, “Yeah, but it looks like Frankenstein’s face in there!”

Oh, well. We’re still making memories.

Blessings from the Exile’s New Kitchen.

Shrug It Off

There would have been a time in my life that a day like today would have riled me. Water heater trouble, plus uncapped pex pipe amounted to a flooded room. Again, a few years ago, I would have considered the mishap a big misfortune. Today? I just found a broom and swept the water out of the room and laughed.

I’m almost through with the big set of kitchen cabinets. The uppers are finished; working now on the lowers. They’re not perfect, but they’re paid for. I like them. That’s all the matters, right? Besides, the food will be so fantastic, no one will notice.

 

 

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I reached a stopping point and sat down at my piano. A no. 2 pencil marked  A through G on the old ivory keys, turned yellow with the decades.

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The teacher’s notes and praise belong to another. It’s been 29 years since I’ve played a piano. Looking forward to relearning how.

A flooded floor, non-perfect kitchen cabinets, weak piano notes; shrug it off.

Blessings.

Cabinets

I’ve learned a lot the last few years. Day to day stuff. Sure. Managing life on my own. Well, not completely alone. The One who will never leave me nor forsake me walks with me, or rather, I Him. I try to.

Strength, deep down,  surfaced after age fifty. I come from a long line of strong women. I am fortunate to have such great examples of feminine fortitude.

My father was a mechanical engineer and could build anything. He was more than just creative; he was more than just talented. Smart and brilliant.

Now, I know I’m not as smart as my father was, but I can see the potential in ordinary, or worn out, or throw-away things. During this last year of renovating my farmhouse, I have often reminded myself that I am George L. Ellison’s daughter.

Equally so, I have recalled the courage and resilience of my mother Madoline when we lost my father in 1981. My mother’s full name is Berenice Madoline. She was named for one of her aunts, who was named for a character in a book her father was reading at the time of his daughter’s birth.  Berenice is Greek, meaning ‘to bear’. Her name also means ‘victory’. Both describe my Mama. She had to bear much, to finish rearing her family by herself. I never heard her complain or play the poor widow. Deep down, her strength surfaced. God Bless Her! What a lady! She never lost her femininity.

Several people have told me that they couldn’t do what I have done. My reply? “You could if you had to.” Who knows? You would probably surprise yourself.

I have been painting kitchen cabinets the last few weeks. Have I ever done that before? Nope. YouTube is great for finding out how. Sand and prime. Sand and paint. Sand and paint again. And again, if need be. The sandpaper represents the rough times in my recent past. Without the sanding, the coats of satin wouldn’t be smoothe or durable. The sanding makes it beautiful.

My father taught me to figure things out. Mama taught me to be beautifully fearless.

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Miss you, Daddy. Love you, Mama.

Blessings from the Exile’s Kitchen.

Blueberry Jam

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We picked blueberries this week. Brentlee ate just as many as he dropped in the bag.  The jam pot was full. And so is the freezer. June is a busy month for harvesting fresh produce. I hope you have an opportunity to get your fill of the goodness.

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Meet Marigold. She’s good company in the kitchen. We jammed to David Gray, while we made blueberry jam.

A Call To The Bull Pin

Can you believe that the local grocery store didn’t have a single package of corn dogs? On the night that LSU plays MSU in the Super Regional, to decide who goes to Omaha for the big game, I wanted to have corn dogs for supper. I will explain: MSU students and fans call LSU students and fans corn dogs. Why exactly I am not sure. Both universities are agricultural schools. It’s kinda funny to me. Kinda the pot calling the kettle black, huh, Mr. Aesop?

I had wanted to tweet out a picture of my plate of corn dogs decorated in squirt mustard words saying, ” Geaux Tigers”. You know, some reverse psychology mojo. Oh, did I not make myself clear? This Baton Rouge, Louisiana born girl is a Tiger supporter.

I sent my son to the grocery store with my short list: corn dogs, squirt mustard and freezer bags. We were given fresh corn and I needed to get it in the freezer. My son was gone just a few minutes when he called home. The grocery store had no corn dogs, what should he get? I told him my substitution and the following recipe is the result.

Corn Dog Muffins

Ingredients:

1 box Jiffy  cornbread mix

1/2 cup self-rising cornmeal

1 egg

1/2 cup milk

1 pack of all beef franks

1/3 block of gouda, shredded  (about 1 cup)

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Preheat oven to 350°.

In a medium bowl stir together the first 4 ingredients. Cut the franks into bite sized pieces. Fill 12 lined muffin cups 3/4 full with the cornbread batter. Drop into each muffin cup the pieces of franks, evenly distributing them. Top each muffin with a generous helping of gouda. Bake for 25 minutes, give or take.

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As you can see, we had fresh corn on the cob too. We enjoyed this ‘call to the bull pin’. Not really enjoying the game, as of this writing, as the MSU Dawgs are ahead of my LSU Tigers by 1 run. Come on, Tigers!

Blessings from the Exile’s Kitchen.

 

Post Script:

Corn Dogs- er- Tigers Win!!!

An Hour And A Half From Everywhere

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Early Easter dinner

After an early Easter dinner for some family members that can’t make it tomorrow, I took a stroll around Magnolia. Where is Magnolia, you ask? I have been asked this many times and usually answer, “In the middle of Nowhere and an hour and a half from Everywhere.” Tucked away off I55 South, close to the Louisiana line, this small town is the center of a cross that’s relatively 90 minutes from Baton Rouge, LA, Natchez, Jackson, and Hattiesburg, MS.

Magnolia is the county seat of Pike County and as I write this I realize that I neglected to take a picture of our courthouse. The grounds are quite pretty with lots of azaleas and magnolias.

Here are 3 of the churches in Magnolia: Episcopalian,  Presbyterian,  and United Methodist. There is also a Catholic and a Southern Baptist Church.

Down the block and around the corner is the Magnolia post office.  Built in the 30’s,  the architecture is very pretty and you step back into a less busy era when you walk through the front doors. Three murals painted by J.H. Fyfe depict rural life of nearly 200 years ago. The dark stained wood work in the foyer is remarkable for a little town like Magnolia. It’s worth a day trip to come and see.

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Missing  a ‘p’, but full of charm

Another block and you’re at the old depot. It was completely renovated a few years back and is now the town hall.

At the opposite corner of the depot grounds and catty-corner across the street is Handy Hardware. This old fashioned hardware store lives up to its name. From live crickets for fishing to plumbing supplies; You need something,  they’ve got it. And in the middle of West Railroad Ave a new consignment shop has opened up. The Me’lange Market has some interesting pieces. And like Handy Hardware you’ll be pleased with what you find in this shop. Another staple and anchor in Magnolia is the Corner Drug Store. It started out on the other end of Railroad Ave,  but was moved quite a while ago to its current location.. It has been in business well over 100 years. Their slogan is ‘right on the corner and right on the price’. I clerked there as a newlywed 30 years ago and now college man works there in the afternoons. Go by and tell him, “Hi!”

I continued my walk and returned home. The huge ancient live oak greeted me in the early evening.

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Magnolia, MS is a nice place to take a respite in Nowhere, while  traveling from Everywhere else. Stop and get a bite to eat at one of our restaurants,  fill up your gas tank , and enjoy the slower pace.

Blessings from the Exile’s Kitchen for a Happy Easter.

Patience

Ecclesiastes 3 says “there is a time for everything, and a season for every activity under the heavens.” 

Time at my farmhouse today was quiet and solitary. Old brown painted back porch walls became a serene blue. The sun slow danced across the restored pine floorboards. The 2″ angled brush was rinsed and reshaped and put away for another weekend.

As I always do, I took a walk around my property before leaving this sunny, winter afternoon.

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The cowcumber  (big leaf magnolia) soared to the clear sky. Country blue, and looking a little forlorn, the mailbox yawned open. George Taber shyly peered through a tangle of limbs. Yellow daffodils waved in the light breeze at the back patio. A broken wooden backboard wobbled under the giant and waxy magnolia.

Like the farmhouse, the old gardens need refurbishing. Someone else’s past is my future. The azaleas are impatient and blooming early. They may get a lesson in patience, by way of another super freeze. Patience…learning it is never easy.

“A time to tear down and a time to build.”  

Patience.

Blessings from the Exile’s Kitchen.

I Got On the Pumpkin Bandwagon

I resisted as long as I could, but gave in this morning before leaving to go work on my farm house. What did I give in to? The pumpkin craze that happens this time of year caught up to me. There was that can of pumpkin in the pantry and pie isn’t what I felt like making- oh, by the way. Did you hear that your favorite canned pumpkin is really yellow squash? Yep. There was an article about it a couple of weeks ago. I wonder if I offer anyone a piece of squash pie this Thanksgiving if I’ll have any takers.

Instead of making pie this morning, I made pumpkin bread.  As always, this bread is not too sweet and great with a cup of coffee.

Here’s the recipe and what to do:

In the bowl of your mixer, combine one 15 ounce can of pumpkin (not pie filling), 2/3 cup white sugar, 3 eggs, 2/3 cup olive oil and 2 teaspoons vanilla. Mix till combined.

In another bowl, whisk together 3 cups all-purpose flour, 1/2 cup chopped pecans, 1 teaspoon salt, 2 teaspoons baking soda, 1 teaspoon cinnamon, 1/2 teaspoon cloves, 1/2 teaspoon baking powder. Once completely combined, pour into the pumpkin mixture and slowly turn on your mixer. The batter will be very stiff. When mixed, divide dough equally into 2 bread pans, that have been sprayed with Pam.  Place in 350° oven and bake for about 80 minutes. Test with a wooden skewer stabbed in the middle. If it comes out clean, your bread is done. Cool before cutting.20161022_081637

Out at my farm house, the weather was perfect. Couldn’t ask for a prettier day than today. Cool temps, clear blue skies. No butterflies this morning, but the honey bees were busy in the pink sasanqua.

I worked today in what use to be the original kitchen. It has been gutted and will be my son’s bedroom and en suite. Its amazing what a couple if coats of primer will do to brighten a  dark fire place mantel. Again, slow progress is still progress.

My old barn is ancient, with quiet stalls lining both sides and a set of stairs to the second story. No floor on the third story, yet, but one day.

Blessings from the Exile’s Kitchen.

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Jesus, I Love You

Since writing this post two years ago, I have sung Jesus, I love You one time during church service. And I cried through the last few lines. The song is on the schedule for this Sunday. I’m asking for prayer. Whether God is glorified through my singing straight through it technically correct or glorified through my tears may He indeed be glorified. 

Blessings for reading again.

It was after our choir had done the musical Somebody’s Praying You Through that our music minister told me he had picked out a new song for me to learn. It was called Jesus, I Love You: written by Norman Hutchins and performed by the Brooklyn Tabernacle  Choir.

I learned the song, concentrating on the notes and I, of course, learned the lyrics. The first time I sang it during worship I had no problem with it. But in choir practice a few weeks later, as we went over the song again, the words really got to me. I couldn’t sing it for sobbing. And when we would present the song for worship, I couldn’t get through it. I would get to a  certain point and then couldn’t finish it.

Joy of my salvation

Peace in my storm

Loving arms protect me

Shelter from harm

My strong tower

My dearest and best friend

I had no problem with these descriptions of Jesus. My hang up was with the line that proclaimed Jesus as my everything. People would ask me, “Amanda, what is it about the song that makes you cry?” I would tell them, “If I were to sit down and write a love letter to Jesus, it’s exactly what I would say.” But now, just being as real and honest as I can be, I knew deep down that wasn’t the truth. And God knew it, too.

You see,  there were parts of my life that I welcomed Jesus in willingly, invitingly. But then there were other areas in my life that I would wave Jesus away and say, “That’s okay. I don’t want to bother You. I can handle it.”

Until September of 2013, then I realized that I didn’t have it by myself and that I did need Jesus present and powerful in every part of my life.  During these last three years, He has been

there when I was lonely,

there in all my pain,

guiding my footsteps,

shelter from the rain.

And it was Him, He has made my life complete. 

He is to me my everything and that is why I sing. 

During the vamp of the song, the lyrics talk about not being ashamed to tell the world. Now that sounds a lot like evangelism. Evangelism, I thought up until this past year, was for other people. Well, in 2016 I have gone on two mission trips: one to Nashville, TN and the other to New Milton, England.

Was way out of my comfort zone, let me tell you. Half way over the Atlantic, the pilot throttled back on the engines. I punched the GPS on in the back of the headrest of the seat in front of me to see how much longer we had to fly. Oh, gee, only about another four hours. Um, Mr. Pilot, are we gonna make it to England? Hhhmmm? Please. Closer to God up in a plane, I guess. Prayers were flying around up there, I can assure you.

On English ground, I met many lovely people, all with hearts focused on God. I found myself opening up and telling my story, from my beginning salvation to my present walk. They responded with warmth, thanked me for my testimony,  and wished me the best. I’ll  always treasure my visit there.

Another adlib in the song praises Jesus with

How You set me free!

Isn’t that the truth?! I am free! As much as I loved my earlier life, I would not want to go back there. The only one I need to please is Him. Which if each of us would make that our priority, this dark world would be a whole lot brighter. Will I cry the next time I sing it? Well, we’ll all find out together. So,

Jesus, I love You. I couldn’t imagine if you were not there.

Blessings from the Exile’s Kitchen.

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Pecans and Pralines

 

My apartment is humming this morning. Saturday is chore day. The laundry room is warm from the tumbling clothes dyer and smelling of Purex and dryer sheets. I have always enjoyed doing laundry: It was an act of service that I did for my family. One chore this moring, however, I had to force myself to do. Unloading the dishwasher. Loading the dishwasher I don’t mind, but unloading it, I’d almost rather take a beating. Am I alone in that sentiment?

One chore I hate.
One chore I hate.

Tomorrow night, weather permitting, will be our church Fall Fest. Our church invites the surrounding neighborhood for free hot dogs, cotton candy, games and just plain fun. The small group that I am a part of uses this time to have a party within a party. We all bring something to share for supper. Cajun Pralines will be my contribution for our fellowship, as we take turns manning our Fall Fest booth.

Cajun Pralines 2 cups light brown sugar 1 cup white sugar 1/2 stick of butter 2 generous tablespoons sorghum syrup 5 ounce can of evaporated milk 2 cups pecans
Cajun Pralines
2 cups light brown sugar
1 cup white sugar
1/2 stick of butter
2 generous tablespoons sorghum syrup
5 ounce can of evaporated milk
2 cups pecans

Now, before I even get started on how to make these, we need to revisit correct pronunciation of a few words. It’s pecan not peecan. A peecan is what? That’s right- something an environmentalist takes with him to the woods. We put pecans in pralines. It is pronounced ‘prawleen’. Please do not put a y after the a. I don’t know what a prayline is, unless there’s no room in the sanctuary and you have to lean against the wall to do your praying.

Place all the ingedients in a two quart pot, over medium high heat. I like to cook with stainless steel pots that have aluminum clad bottoms. They cook like aluminum pots, but aren't as heavy. Stir all of the ingredients together and keep slowly stirring till the mixture starts to boil.
Place everything except the pecans in a two quart pot, over medium high heat. I like to cook with stainless steel pots that have aluminum clad bottoms. They cook like aluminum pots, but aren’t as heavy.
Stir the ingredients together and keep slowly stirring till the mixture starts to boil.
I don't use a candy thermometer. A Pyrex dish filled with ice water is how I test to see if candy has reached the correct stage.
I don’t use a candy thermometer. A Pyrex dish filled with ice water is how I test to see if candy has reached the correct stage.

Stir candy in circles or figure eights till it reaches the soft ball stage. Take a little bit of the sugar mixture and drop it in the ice water. If you can mold it into a soft ball, it’s time to add the -the what? That’s right! The pecans. Stir them in well and remove from the heat.

Now you will get an arm workout in. I hear Michael Jackson singing Beat It. At this stage you’ve got to whip enough air into the candy to cool it down so it can be dropped into patties and also so the pralines will be creamy. Clear a good sized space either on your kitchen counter or table. Spread out parchment paper and give it a light spray of Pam. With a tablespoon also sprayed with Pam, drop the candy mixture evenly onto the paper. Test a few at first. Don’t drop the whole pot of candy. Make sure they are setting up. If they are, work quickly. If they’re not setting up, beat the mixture a few more minutes. Be careful at this stage of the game. The candy will start to crystallize around the sides of the pot. A little is okay  a lot means you’ve about waited too late to drop your pralines. If that has happened don’t you dare throw away that lump of sugar, milk and pecans. Scrape it out of that pot, break it into pieces and sprinkle it over ice cream or over the top of a sweet potato pie during its last few minutes of baking. Do not just throw it out.

That one, there second from the bottom-perfect!
That one, there, second from the bottom-perfect!

It took me several tries, as a newlywed, to finally learn when to quit stirring the candy pot and drop pralines at just the right time. I hope these make it to the Fall Fest tomorrow night. Cajun Pralines and a cup of coffee sounds great right about now.

Enjoy your Saturday.

Jesus, I Love You

via Jesus, I Love You

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My Grandmother’s Scarf

To the reader in India, who has looked at this post, will you tell me, please, why? Is it the title? Is it that I wrote about renovating my old farmhouse? Is it that I told how melancholy it is to have a child go away to college? Is it the mention of my difficult past with natural disasters? Is it the little thought at the end of my inspirational Grandmother? Really, I’d like know. Thank you for visiting theexileskitchen. Blessings.

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Randomness

Last week it rained. The week before that it rained.  And the week before that. It’s soggy. None of my family in the Baton Rouge area were personally affected, but they are helping with the clean up and tearing out. Brings back childhood memories- sad, scary ones. This flooding in Louisiana is worse than what we experienced in 1983. My heart goes out to my native city. Our church collected needed items last Monday. I gave what I could.

My youngest went back to school Saturday afternoon. All day he kept asking if I was going to miss him.

“I already do and you’re not even gone yet,” was my answer.

He threw open his big arms and said like he did when he was little: “Hug?”

I hugged. He packed. Getting into his truck, he hesitated, jingled the keys.

“You know, if you need anything, just call me.”

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